Building Addition & Remodeling Update

The following is an update on our expansion and remodel from our director, Liz Rozelle.


 

If you have been curious about how the library building project is coming along, I have an update. I hope to publish these reports along the way to keep our community informed about the progress of this project. Your support as we worked together to convince the town council to approve funding was the key to success for this exciting project. This is your library and your project and I want you to know how things are going. Feel free to contact me at (765) 759-9723 anytime, and I can update you personally as well.

Homeland Security has designated a portion of the library parking lot as being in a floodplain. This will not stop the project from going forward, however, the process we have to go through will simply delay the project. The architect and I are working through the process and working with the Department of Natural Resources (DNR) to make sure we jump through all the necessary hoops to get this accomplished. We have completed the required elevation surveys and are now working to get the hydrology report that is also required.

This leads us to two possible scenarios at this time. If we get the OK from the DNR to proceed and can get the project bid by September, we are hoping to break ground by mid-October. Work would begin on the addition with the goal of getting this new structure in the ground and covered by mid-December. Once that is done, the crew will start working on remodeling the interior of the existing library during the winter months. In the spring, the work could move outdoors and the outside remodeling will be done.

If the floodplain issues are not resolved soon enough, the project will be bid in the early spring and construction would start then also. Either way, it will take about one year to complete the project. Along the way, we will need to be patient and keep our eye on the prize. We plan to stay open as much as we can and only anticipate short closings throughout the project. In the end, we will have a beautiful library that functions for everyone!

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Liz Rozelle
Director of Library Services
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Your Guide to the 2018 Summer Reading Program

It seemed like winter was going to last forever in Indiana, but we made it! The trees are blooming, the sun is hot, and it’s time for Summer Reading! This year’s theme is Libraries Rock, and we have a great series of events lined up to prove just that. Keep reading to find out what’s in store!

Registration

First things first: You have to register to participate. Registration for all ages opens Friday, May 25 at the library.

Here’s how the age groups are divided:

  • Cubs (birth-pre-K)
  • Tigers (Kindergarten-5th grade*)
  • Teens (6th grade-age 17)
  • Adults (18+)

To register, you’ll just need to fill out your information and grab some reading logs or review sheets. Cubs, tigers, and teens will register at the desk in the children’s area. Adults will register at the desk in the adult area.

That’s all it takes! Once you’ve registered, you’re ready to start  reading and earning prizes.

*Homeschooled children are welcome to participate! Grade years are meant as an age guide.

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Get your photo taken with the Troll Princess during our Kick-Off Carnival!

We’re kicking off the Summer Reading Program with a fun carnival in Morrow’s Meadow! On Saturday, May 26 from 11:00 am-1:00 pm, you can join us for carnival games, a tiger bounce house, and a very special visit from the Troll Princess.

If the weather doesn’t cooperate, the carnival will be moved to the Pleasant View Elementary School Gym. Be sure to follow us on Facebook for up-to-date information.


How to Earn Prizes

Reading is fun on its own, but the Summer Reading Program is all about those prizes! Each age group earns prizes a little differently, so check out how it works for your age group below:

cubs

  • Since many participants in this age group aren’t reading on their own yet, Cubs earn a prize for every hour that they read or are read to.
  • There is a limit of 3 prizes per week.
  •  For every 10 hours that your child reads or is read to, they will earn one ticket into the drawing for the Super Reader Prize.
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CUBS SUPER READER PRIZE: 
Fire HD 8 Kids Edition Tablet with One Year of Amazon Free Time!


tigers

  • Tigers can earn a prize for every hour they read.
  • There is a limit of 3 prizes per week.
  • For every 20 hours read, Tigers will earn one ticket into the drawing for the Super Reader Prize.
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 TIGER SUPER READER PRIZE: 
Apple iPad

 


teens

  • For every book you read, you’ll fill out a short review sheet.
  • For each book review you submit, you’ll earn one ticket.
  • Tickets will then be used for the weekly prize drawings:
    • Laser Tag Passes
    • Holiday World Tickets
    • Big Splash Adventure Tickets
    • Fire TV Stick
    • Cincinnati Reds Tickets
    • Splash Island Tickets
    • Bluetooth Wireless Speaker

All tickets will be saved and put into the drawing for the Super Reader Prize.

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TEEN SUPER READER PRIZE: 
Beats Wireless Headphones

adults

  • For every book you read, you’ll fill out a short book review or recommendation sheet.
  • For each book review or recommendation you submit, you’ll earn one ticket.
  • Tickets will then be used for the weekly prize drawings:
    • T-shirts
    • Book Bags
    • Gift Cards
    • Books
    • Kindle Fire
    • Fire TV Stick
    • Fitbit
    • Keurig Brewing System
    • Amazon Echo
  • All tickets will be saved and put into the Grand Prize Drawing.
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ADULT GRAND PRIZE: 
Fire HD 10 Tablet

To be counted toward the Super Reader Prize, Tigers and Cubs must turn in their reading logs by noon on Wednesday, July 11.

Adults and Teens must turn in book review sheets by 3:00 pm on Friday, July 13 to be counted toward the Super Reader/Grand Prize drawing.


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Every Wednesday in June, we’ll have a special event for families. Check out this year’s entertainment below!

CR Ryan Magic Show

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CR Ryan 2017

CR Ryan brings his entertaining magic show to the Summer Reading Program every year, and we’re so glad to have him back again! CR Ryan preforms with his sons for a show that’s fun for the whole family!

  • Wednesday, June 6
  • 2:00 pm
  • Morrow’s Meadow*


Freddy Fossil’s Dino Show

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New to the Summer Reading lineup this year is Freddy Fossil’s Dino Show! You won’t want to miss the “pre-hysterical” family fun when Freddy brings out his life-size dinosaur puppets!

  • Wednesday, June 13
  • 2:00 pm
  • Pleasant View Elementary School Gym

Indiana Wild Live Animal Show

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Animal Show 2017 (1)
IN Wild 2017

Indiana Wild is back this year! Get up close and personal with real animals as you learn about their environment and conservation!

  • Wednesday, June 20
  • 2:00 pm
  • Pleasant View Elementary School Gym


What’s That Sound?

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Surf the sound waves with Paul Odenwelder as he shows the many ways we can combine sounds to create music! With lots of audience participation and crazy instruments, this show is one you won’t want to miss!

  • Wednesday, June 27
  • 2:00 pm
  • Morrow’s Meadow*

Grand Finale: The Water Show!

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The Water Show 2017

Magic Don is back again this year with his water magic show! Celebrate the end of Summer Reading with this fun and crazy event. Dress to get wet!

  • Wednesday, July 11
  • 2:00 pm
  • Morrow’s Meadow*
*Any show marked as taking place at Morrow’s Meadow is weather permitting. In the case of inclement weather, those events will be moved to the P.V.E. Gym. Be sure to follow us on Facebook for the most up-to-date information.


Frequently Asked Questions

Q: Do I have to be a patron to register and participate in the Summer Reading Program?

A: No! While we would LOVE for you to sign up for a library card, it is not a requirement for participation.

Q: Do I have to read only library books?

A: Nope! Again, we would love it if you checked out books and/or eBooks from the library, but it’s not required.

Q: Do I have to be present to win the prize drawings?

A: No way, Jose. All winners will be notified via phone or email after each drawing.

Q: What is the deadline for registering?

A: There is no registration deadline. You can start participating as late into the program as you want, but keep in mind, the longer you participate, the better your chances are of winning!

Q: Do audio books count?

A: They sure do! Tigers and Cubs, just record the hours you listen. Teens and Adults, just fill out a review like you would with a regular book.

Have a question that’s not answered here? Contact us.


We are so excited to kick off the 2018 Summer Reading Program with our community! We strive to make it as fun and inclusive as possible, and we hope everyone has a great time!

To end, we would like to thank the wonderful sponsors who make this program and all the prizes possible:

Gold Level Sponsors:

Aldi
eKeeper Systems
Warner Fit
Mutual Bank
Navient
Yorktown Family Dentistry

Silver Level Sponsors:

Animal Medical Center
Ingram’s Floor Covering
Mark’s Service Center
Meek’s Mortuary
Ontario Systems
Rachel Tucker-F.C. Tucker
Reed’s Plumbing LLC
Ryne-Wood Builders, Inc.
Scott Metzler- State Farm
Wee Wisdom

Bronze Level Sponsors:

5 Tool Academy
Academy of Model Aeronautics
Advanced Carpet Care
Big Splash Adventure
Cincinnati Reds
Dairy Queen
Great Kitchens and Baths
Holiday World
Hot Heads
Indianapolis Colts
Indianapolis Motor Speedway
Jimmy John’s
Laser Flash
Michael Burke- Re/Max
Minnetrista
Muncie Children’s Museum
National Model Aviation Museum
Player’s Club at Woodland Trails
Royal Pin Leisure Centers
Science Central
Splash Island
Terre Haute Children’s Museum

 

Thank you!

Celebrating Banned Books Week!

This week (September 24-30) marks the beginning of Banned Books Week! During this week, libraries, teachers, and bookstores all around the country encourage you to use your First Amendment rights and read banned and challenged books. 

Why do we celebrate Banned Books Week?

Banned Books Week was launched in 1982 by librarian activist, Judith Krug. Krug, in partnership with the American Library Association, wanted to draw attention to the issue of censorship after the group Moral Majority, led by televangelist Jerry Falwell, began challenging books in public and school libraries. Censorship incidents jumped from 300 in 1980 to nearly 1,000 in 1982. Banned Books Week was founded as a response to this quest for censorship and has been quite successful. In 2016, 323 challenges were reported to the American Library Association.

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Challenges do not always equal a ban. A challenge is the attempt to remove a book from an institution (i.e. schools and libraries), while a ban is the actual removal of that title. This distinction is important to consider. Challenging a book may, in fact, lead to an open discussion about that book’s themes and engage a community. However, if a challenge leads to a ban (it is the first step of a ban, after all), that discussion is cut off.

An argument may be presented that “banning” a book from a library doesn’t totally restrict access to that book. After all, Amazon exists, as well as a host of other retailers. But that’s the problem. Banning a book from a library restricts the FREE access of that book. Libraries exist to serve the entire community, including those who need free access to information. Judith Krug illustrated this point in 2002:

“Some users find materials in their local library collection to be untrue, offensive, harmful or even dangerous. But libraries serve the information needs of all of the people in the community—not just the loudest, not just the most powerful, not even just the majority. Libraries serve everyone.”

It is precisely because libraries serve everyone that one group cannot be allowed to decide what is offensive to everyone. Literature is an art form, and as such, it is subjective. It is our job as librarians to ensure that every member of our community has equal access to that art. As the old saying goes: “A truly great library contains something in it to offend everyone.”

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How do I celebrate Banned Books Week?

By reading a banned book, of course! Many books have been banned over the course of history, including classics like The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, The Call of the Wild, and Beloved. You can find a full list of banned books that helped shape America here.

As discussed above, before books are banned, they are first challenged. The top ten challenged books of 2016 are listed below. Titles with links will take you directly to our catalog, where you can see if the book is available or place a hold!

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  1. This One Summer written by Mariko Tamaki and illustrated by Jillian Tamaki
    Reasons: challenged because it includes LGBT characters, drug use and profanity, and it was considered sexually explicit with mature themes
  2. Drama written and illustrated by Raina Telgemeier
    Reasons: challenged because it includes LGBT characters, was deemed sexually explicit, and was considered to have an offensive political viewpoint
  3. George written by Alex Gino
    Reasons: challenged because it includes a transgender child, and the “sexuality was not appropriate at elementary levels”
  4. I Am Jazz written by Jessica Herthel and Jazz Jennings, and illustrated by Shelagh McNicholas
    Reasons: challenged because it portrays a transgender child and because of language, sex education, and offensive viewpoints
  5. Two Boys Kissing written by David Levithan
    Reasons: challenged because its cover has an image of two boys kissing, and it was considered to include sexually explicit LGBT content
  6. Looking for Alaska written by John Green
    Reasons: challenged for a sexually explicit scene that may lead a student to “sexual experimentation”
  7. Big Hard Sex Criminals written by Matt Fraction and illustrated by Chip Zdarsky
    Reason: challenged because it was considered sexually explicit
  8. Make Something Up: Stories You Can’t Unread written by Chuck Palahniuk
    Reasons: challenged for profanity, sexual explicitness, and being “disgusting and all around offensive”
  9. Little Bill (series) written by Bill Cosby and and illustrated by Varnette P. Honeywood
    Reason: challenged because of criminal sexual allegations against the author
  10. Eleanor & Park written by Rainbow Rowell
    Reason: challenged for offensive language

Go forth and celebrate your First Amendment rights!

You may want to read many of the banned/challenged books in these lists, or none at all. Celebrating Banned Books Week is as much about reading what you desire as it is about not infringing on the rights of others to do the same.

Let us know what banned or challenged book you’re reading in the comments below!

 

Sources: 

A. (2017, April). The State of America’s Libraries 2017. Retrieved September 19, 2017, from http://www.ala.org/news/sites/ala.org.news/files/content/State-of-Americas-Libraries-Report-2017.pdf

About. (n.d.). Retrieved September 19, 2017, from http://www.bannedbooksweek.org/about

Crum, M. (2015, September 28). This Is Why You Should Celebrate Banned Books Week. Retrieved September 19, 2017, from http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/celebrate-banned-books-week_us_56096a1ae4b0768126fe4cca

Jerry Falwell, Judith Krug, and the Origins of ‘Banned Books Week’. (2015, October 02). Retrieved September 19, 2017, from https://longreads.com/2015/10/02/jerry-falwell-judith-krug-and-the-origins-of-banned-books-week/

 

Unlimited Possibilities @ Your Library

It’s National Library Week this week and do you know what that means? It’s a time for us to get together to celebrate libraries and promote using the library! This year’s theme is “Unlimited Possibilities @ Your Library”. So make sure to get into your local library and discover all the information and programming that is available to you, with a simple piece of plastic in your pocket/wallet.

History

In the late 1950s, the American Library Association (ALA) and the American Book Publishers (ABP) realized there was a decline in how much money people were spending on books. Fearing a decline in how much people were reading, they formed the National Book Committee who’s sole purpose was to get Americans excited about reading again. So in 1958, the Committee set up the first annual National Library Week (the theme was “Wake Up and Read”). The idea was to get people excited about reading again by getting the enthused about the library. People began to use libraries again!

Today, National Library Week has taken on more than simply getting people reading again. They even introduced three special celebration days within the week to help celebrate different things that libraries do.

National Library Workers Day

On the Tuesday of National Library Week, we take a day to celebrate all the staff, administrators and Friends groups that help our libraries run. If you want to make a special recognition to someone at your library, the site for National Library Workers Day takes recommendations for “Stars”. These “Stars” are featured on their website along with the great things you have to say about them. So you can celebrate this day, by nominating someone from your library to be a “Star”!

The YPL Staff celebrating Halloween 2014
The YPL Staff celebrating Halloween 2014

National Bookmobile Day

On the Wednesday of National Library Week we celebrate the mobile service that many libraries use called the Bookmobile. Bookmobile services take books to the people, instead of making people come to the library. You can see them at community events, traveling to schools and daycare centers, and even to nursing homes. Some libraries do not have a “Bookmobile” but do have a service to bring materials to their patrons who are homebound.

Weapon of Mass Instruction created by Argentinian artist Raul Lemesoff
Weapon of Mass Instruction created by Argentinian artist Raul Lemesoff

Celebrate Teen Literature Day

The Thursday of National Library Week is Celebrate Teen Literature Day. This day was set up as a way to show that Young Adult literature is a strong, vibrant, and growing genre with a lot to offer today’s teens. Many of us are familiar with this genre, if for no other reason than Hollywood keeps making movies based on these books. Harry Potter, The Hunger Games, Percy Jackson, and the Twilight series are all examples of popular Young Adult books. However, there are still plenty of great books that have not been made into movies (yet). Need help? Ask you Youth Librarian for help finding these!

Bookends painted to depict Young Adult book covers. Done by our Teen Scene group
Bookends painted to depict Young Adult book covers. Done by our Teen Scene group

With this week upon us, make sure you get into your library to see what they offer! Even bring in someone new to get them a library card. If you visit your library regularly, on behalf of all libraries, we thank you for your support. You are why we continue to be great community assets all over the world.

If you want more information on National Library Week, check out the ALA website, and if you want to know what your library is doing make sure to contact them.

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